Tag Archives: bisphenol a

Why was Bisphenol A (BPA) discontinued in baby bottles?

 

Bisphenol A, or BPA, is used to line food cans and also to make strong plastic baby bottles. Eating large amounts of canned food – particularly canned soups or drinking hot liquids from baby bottles – can result in elevated amounts of BPA being detected in people’s urine. BPA acts as an estrogen mimic – albeit a very weak one – and some research has suggested a link between large doses of BPA and an increase of blood pressure. While this does sound worrying, remember that the dose is extremely important and that the molecules of BPA that do leech into food are too few to have any measurable effect.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (the FDA) conducted a four-year review of over 300 scientific studies and concluded that the traces of BPA that do migrate into canned food are so tiny that they have no effect on human health.

The decision to abandon the use of BPA in baby bottles was therefore based on public pressure not based on safety or on scientific evidence.

The science never suggested there was any safety concern with BPA.

Don’t forget to like and subscribe for more videos from Sincerely, Chemicals.