Tag Archives: Theoretical physics

Book: Information

Information: The New Language of Science
Info about info. That’s all there is.

Never really takes off.
272 pages, ★

Information lacks relevance throughout. I was asking, “What’s the point of this book?” somewhere around the middle. I only finished this book because I was in a hospital waiting room and found it slightly more entertaining than watching kindergarten programmes on the overhead TV.

I lost interest completely at this point:

“Imagine twisting the beads on your team’s necklace and watching the corresponding beads on the other team’s necklace twist in the opposite direction. Now imagine shattering that necklace and asking them what order the beads were in by asking them to re-twist them. Of course, the only beads whose directions can’t be communicated are the ones attached to the clasp. That’s basically Quantum Theory.”

Paraphrased from page two-hundred-and-something

This drivel disappoints me. I expect PopSci (that’s Popular Science) to bridge the gap between theory and application, thus bringing researchers closer to the public. Unfortunately, this book pushes them further apart.

This is a shame, because there’s some fascinating research being done in the field of Information Theory:

  • Enigma machines (WW2)
  • earthquake prediction
  • election fraud
  • stock market fluctuations
  • gambling cheats
  • evolution of religion
  • music analysis
  • and more…

This book fails to communicate all of this amazing stuff.

Information needs to be edited by Dr Karl Kruszelnicki to make it relevant and fun. I sincerely hope that this book isn’t the “new language of science” as its subtitle claims. ★

Book: The Trouble with Physics

The Trouble With Physics The Rise of String Theory, The Fall of a Science, and What Comes Next
Available in black, magnolia, blue or an elegantly redesigned white edition.

An inconclusive book on an inconclusive subject.
416 pages, ★

Physics is dead. Or maybe it’s just finished. According to the Trouble with Physics, no significant progress has been made towards a ‘grand unifying theory’ since the 1980s. Unfortunately, that was when the author started his physics career.

Theories are developed that fit the available evidence at the time. According to Popper, “a theory is only good until it’s falsified”, and according to Einstein, “a theory should be as simple as it can possibly be, but no simpler”. Theories thus tend to be simple (at least in retrospect) and short-lived.

The trouble with physics comes with the most recent theory, String Theory. It’s neither simple nor short-lived. In fact, it’s so complicated that most physicists don’t fully understand it (or that’s what they claim), and because it can never be proven or disproven, it is effectively permanent. Author Lee Smolin talks about the quasi-religious following surrounding String Theory and its excessive derision of critics. To me, the String Theory lobby sounds about as entrenched as that of climate change, or of intelligent design. If that’s the case, then physics is definitely finished.

As a newcomer to physics, I learned a lot of theory from this book. I learned about General Relativity, Quantum Theory, Loop Quantum Gravity, Technicolor, Twistor Theory and MSSM theory; and the discoveries made by Aristotle, Kepler, Galileo, de Sitter, Einstein, Kelvin, Eddington, Popper and many, many more. Despite the level of detail in this book, math is used only sparingly—which is why I chose this book over others.

The Trouble With Physics is suitable for non-physicists who want to reassure themselves that they made the right career choice. In just 416 pages, The Trouble with Physics provides enough background information to understand passing conversations with physicists, and to understand almost all Big Bang Theory jokes. This book is the most readable in its category.